Kelly Reina, graduate student

 

Kelly graduated from the University of Michigan, and then spent a year as a research assistant at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. She joined the graduate program at ASU in 2012. She conducts experimental work on nonhuman primates and children, to study the phylogenetic origins and ontogenetic development of prosocial preferences.

 

Vance Reeds, graduate student

 

Vance graduated from Canisius College in 2013, and joined the graduate program at ASU in the same year. He is interested in how sexual selection shapes the male phenotype across animals. He has studied sexual behavior in beluga whales and paternal behavior in killer whales. His   current research focuses on reproductive strategies in male anubis baboons (Papio anubis) in Kenya.

Samantha  Patterson, graduate student

 

Sam graduated from the University of Michigan, and spent a year working as a research assistant on the CABS project. She joined the graduate program at ASU in 2014. Sam is interested in the evolution of social behavior across primates and is particularly interested in variation in female social bonds, female aggression, and interactions between the sexes.

Eila Roberts, postdoctoral fellow

 

Eila earned her Ph.D. in Biospychology from the University of Michigan in 2012, where she studied reproductive endocinology in geladas. She discovered that pregnant gelada females spontaneously abort shortly after takeovers by new males, and showed that this strategy is an adaptive response when the risk of infanticide by new males is high. She is now running the Comparative Analysis of Baboon Sociality (CABS) project in Kenya.

Megan Best, research assistant

 

Megan graduated from ASU 2014, and is now a research assistant on the CABS project. For her honors project, Megan analyzed social networks of female baboons.